Bearding the Crystal Dragon – Thoughts on the ‘Deep State’ and Modern Conspiracies

Bearding the Crystal Dragon – Thoughts on the ‘Deep State’ and Modern Conspiracies

Partway through the campaign of Donald Trump, people started talking about the ‘Deep State’. Not that the idea started then, it’s been around for a while, but during the Trump campaign the notion gained currency and support, and has been part of the culture of the Trump Administration all the way through. The Deep State theory has been mocked by many, is believed to extremes by many others, and is widely misunderstood by many others. This post is my take on what the Deep State is, is not, and how we may proceed to best benefit as a nation in this regard.

The theory I see most often goes like this: For a long time now, a small group of people have run the government without running for office, or even letting people know they exist as a power group. The names vary (Rothschilds, Illuminati, Bilderburgs, Freemasons, etc.), as does the location where they meet and make decisions, but they are always cast as extremely wealthy and powerful. Almost every major catastrophe is mentioned as a planned event to maintain power or protect their interests, even when the events make no sense. Personally, I attribute that to the human trait of pattern recognition. We get used to finding patterns wherever they are, an sometimes see them when they don’t really exist in reality.

That’s not to say I don’t believe conspiracies exist, or that there are no groups which seek to take and hold power. But it’s not quite so organized or effective as the theories claim.

For example, consider organized crime. Criminals learned very early that even a smart and strong man can be caught if he works alone, so they formed bands of robbers for protection and advantage. Remember that “Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves” is a story more than a thousand years old, after all. By the time we get to modern organized crime, even though the movies talk about a few families running everything, and yes those families had tremendous wealth and power in their territory, but on the national scale we’re talking about hundreds of gangs and crime families and crime organizations.

https://www.fbi.gov/investigate/organized-crime

The idea that there is a single overseer group which steals money by the billions (some say trillions) of dollars a year from the public, well that’s laughable. The math just does not work out. And all those gangs and crime families would find out in short order who had their money as they saw it. The Illuminazis would be hunted down and killed by the gangs in short order.

The same thing applies to government power. While some alliances and families rise to power, there is an ebb and flow to this as well. A cursory review of Presidents can show some of this. Let’s start with the Democrats.


Franklin Roosevelt changed the Democrats’ fortunesin politics. He was the first Democrat elected President since Wilson, but more importantly he changed the course of the nation and redefined the Democratic Party for a generation. But his legacy passed, and the Democrats soon enough found a new leader in ideals:


John F Kennedy. A lot of people don’t understand that one reason JFK almost lost the 1960 election, was because a lot of Democrats compared him – unfavorably – to FDR. But soon after taking office as President, John installed a new culture that shaped the nation for a generation.

Poor Lyndon just couldn’t meet the standard.

My point is, FDR and JFK each faced an established cadre in power when they started their careers, but each overcome the establishment and replaced it with their own goals, ideals and plans. Bill Clinton and Barack Obama did the same. In fact, that is part of the reason Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were enemies for most of their common years; the Clintons saw Obama as an interloper on a political empire they built.

The Republicans did the same.

A lot of people have never heard of ‘Rockefeller Republicans‘. But when Ronald Reagan began his climb to national office as President, he had to fight an entrenched system based on East Coast go-along business-as-usual politics. Reagan’s leadership is legendary today, but never forget he started as an outsider, a man mocked as clueless about how the world really worked, even though he had been Governor of California.

A lot of people will scoff to read it, but George W Bush helped avert a serious national disaster by winning the 2000 election. And like Reagan, W was roundly mocked by Democrats, as unqualified for the job, even though like Reagan his resume included Governorship of a major state.

Which brings us to President Donald Trump.

Read that title again: President of the United States Donald Trump. Remember that there were lots of people in the media who literally made fun of Trump just for running, and some of his GOP opponents were derisive and insulting as well. The Deep State, where Trump is concerned, is not some global satanic gang of billionaire dilettantes, but a far more mundane collection of bullies and old-boys-club mandarins.

The old Egyptian pharaohs had to contend with priests who wanted to run things behind the scenes. Rome saw the Caesars battle against the Senate. And the middle ages were replete with devious plans to build power; a lot of people forget that Machiavelli did not invent labyrinthian plots or complex plans for building conspiracies. There has always been a system, in every nation and culture, where the people in power, be they a king or a President, find themselves surrounded by people who are there to help. Help with getting this or fixing that, but yes they also know a bit about this issue or that idea, and they would be happy to help you understand the matter in detail. And when these staffers move on, their brothers and sisters and sons and daughters and friends will be there, to help you handle all that work, you see.

And many of them really do mean well. But they also recognize that elected officials come and go, but the system stays. And after a time, the people in that system think that whenever a new official disagrees with them, well that just proves the individual is not right for the job. And some elected officials go along with the system.

These are not bad men, but they weren’t strong enough to resist the system. It takes someone willing to be mocked, to be fought, to stand alone, to change things for the better.

I will be blunt here. I did not support Donald Trump in the primaries. I thought him a faker, a blowhard, far from the ideal candidate to lead our nation.

But since his election, judging by the words he has used in speaking as President, and the accomplishments he has already made so far, I see much worth in President Trump. He is far from a perfect man, but he takes the job as President seriously, and he is changing the culture of government to one of hard work and keeping promises.

There are conspiracies against Trump. The Democrats fear him as a man who will make a difference in our nation’s standing and course. The Republicans fear him as a man who will make them keep their word, or be held accountable. The media fear him as a man who will expose their hypocrisy.

Frankly, we are overdue for such a man.

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Whats Wrong With 18th & Vine District?

Whats Wrong With 18th & Vine District?

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The 18th & Vine District has suffered from a lack of investment for decades, but it hasn’t been disinvestment as many have complained. When the 18th & Vine District was in its heyday it wasn’t because of outside investment. It was because of community investment. At the time blacks were limited in where they could do business due to racism and segregation so they were forced to trade amongst themselves, however, once those segregation laws were relaxed blacks could trade anywhere. The truth is, it was blacks who stop investing in the district which caused it to fail.

As a result of this failure, there were a number of groups who laid claim to leadership of the redevelopment effort. The problem with this strategy is of course when you have too many cooks in the kitchen, etc. Anyone wanting to do business in the district had to meet with several different groups and get approval from all of them. The city appeared to be the only group willing to jump through those hoops and continued to invest heavily in the district. The consequence of these actions is, of course, no one wanted to do business in the 18th & Vine District. The following excerpt from a report by a group of consultants hired by the city demonstrates why the district has continued to suffer.

The report paints a bleak picture of the museum in the 18th & Vine District. The museum opened in 1997 and is operated by a non-profit in partnership with the city. Consultants cite stale exhibit offerings, poor financial management and low staff morale. The review is sharply critical of the museum executive director Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner and senior staff, holding them responsible for “numerous missteps, questionable decisions and a lack of transparency.”KansasCity.Com

Rather than seek to find the most qualified individual to lead the redevelopment the city has consistently bowed to pressure to appoint a black person and instead of making that person the point of contact for the entire 18th & Vine District. They continued to hire these black executives who have done nothing to improve the district. But rather than take responsibility for their ineptitude these same people and groups blame racism or the failure of whites to frequent the district. There are only a handful of venues in the district and three of those are being funded directly by the city. How can you have an entertainment district with no entertainment? And then complain when nobody comes. That’s like me having a concert, but I don’t have any bands and I complain nobody came to my concert.

Consultants also said AJM’s 23-member board of directors is bloated and ineffective at fundraising. They recommended that the board “be pared down to a small, core group of passionate and impactful individuals (approximately 8-10 people), including civic leaders, museum professionals, and philanthropic leaders, who will fully commit to guiding the Museum through an in-depth planning process.”KansasCity.Com

It is difficult to get 8 – 10 people to agree on anything, how are you supposed to get 23 people to agree? The current board as constituted is ineffective because they weren’t selected to be, they were elected to be seen and to rubberstamp the policies of these ineffective executives. Now the city has created a source of funding and realizes they have to ensure those funds are being used as designed. Hence, the need for the consultants. I hope the city can sort out this mess and return the 18th & Vine District to what it should be. An entertainment destination for jazz enthusiast from around the world. In order to do that they will have to be willing to make some tough decisions which in the past they have been reluctant to do. And the district has suffered for their inaction and lack of courage.

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Police Shootings & MLK Jr. Drive?

Police Shootings & MLK Jr. Drive?

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Ok so now that we have solved the black on black violence problem in Kansas City, we can now focus on the really important issues like. Naming a street after Martin Luther King or all of the unarmed police shootings in 2017 which happened to be 1 or .007 of the total of murders in Kansas City, MO. that year. You would think with all of the major challenges facing black people in this country and in Kansas City, in particular, a Martin Luther King memorial or police killing unarmed civilians would not be one of them. However, in order to keep the focus off of the real issues facing black people, we have these so-called leaders who keep the focus on these nonissues.

Granted, any unarmed person shot by police is a tragedy and should be addressed, however, compared to the numbers of unarmed people being killed by persons who did not work for the police department it is minuscule. In order for black politicians and service organizations to maintain their hold on the black electorate, they continue to invent crises where black people must be protected and served by them from all of those evil forces such as racism, police murdering black folks indiscriminately, and lack of cultural symbolism.

Patience has run out, said the Rev. Vernon Howard, president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference-KC, “This scourge and disease of police brutality . . . wrapped in racism . . . must stop,” he said, “and it must stop now!”… But now, with too much of the white community “in panic,” and too much of the black community “in despair and rage,” the city is in a “moral crisis,” he said.Kansas City.Com

My question is with the history of streets being named after Martin Luther King why would you want to do that to a street.

The urban decay along Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in St. Louis can be found in other major American cities, from Houston and Milwaukee to the nation’s capital.

“It’s a national problem,” said Melvin White, a 46-year-old postal worker in St. Louis and founder of a 3-year-old nonprofit group that is trying to restore King’s legacy on asphalt. “Dr. King would be turning over in his grave.”New Jersey.Com

Almost every Martin Luther King Boulevard in this country is marked by poverty, violence, and strife. If King were alive today and saw the condition of his memorials I’m sure he would ask his name to be removed. Yet this is a burning issue for black people in Kansas City, whereas the violence and murders are not. Due to the importance of this issue, the mayor appointed a committee to study it and make recommendations. Talk about leadership. A leader leads, a follower waits and takes the temperature before making a decision.

Mayor Sly James might have spoken up sooner about his 11th-hour brainstorm to form a citizens’ commission that will lead a community-wide conversation on how best to honor the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Even if unintentionally, his last-minute plan comes off as disrespectful to Congressman Emanuel Cleaver and to the group of African-American ministers who have already put a lot of time and effort into their plan to rename The Paseo for King.

But though his timing is unfortunate, the process he’s proposing is solid.Kansas City.Com

The local newspaper is applauding his leading from behind and you wonder why the people are so ill-informed? It reminds me of the quote from Booker T. Washington about the class of race solvers and their reasons for focusing on the issue.

“There is (a) class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs — partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs. … ” – Booker T. Washington

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Stupid Is As Mueller Does

Stupid Is As Mueller Does

The train wreck is on the way …

You have probably read or heard by now, that the FBI raided the office, home, and hotel room of Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2018/04/09/yikes-the-fbi-has-raided-the-office-of-president-trumps-personal-lawyer-n2469296

The liberals, as you may expect, are once again gloating that this is the beginning of the end for President Trump.

In fact, it could easily prove to be Robert Mueller’s biggest blunder, in a season of faceplants.

We all know well, by now, how Robert Mueller turned a blind eye – at best – to deliberate attempts to skew the investigation into a witch hunt against President Trump. Strzok and Page’s texts, McCabe’s lies, and so on have been an embarrassing series of blunders for an ostensibly unbiased Special Counsel. A reasonable course would have been for Mueller to fire those clowns as soon as he learned of their unethical behavior. Indeed, that is what Mueller says he did, although the timing is suspicious, because Mueller did not officially ‘notice’ the bias until media reports revealed the corruption.

Note also that Mueller made no apology for the behavior of his staff. That was also a bad decision by Mueller.

But wait! That’s what the liberals will say, reminding us that the FBI raised Cohen, not Mueller.

Interestingly, at the same time the FBI announced the raid, they also mentioned that they were operating on a tip from … Robert Mueller.

Why does this matter?

Cohen is Trump’s personal lawyer. Normally, communications between an attorney and client are protected. It’s a very big deal if that privilege is violated.

The ‘tip’ from Mueller is that Cohen paid off Daniels on instructions from Trump. That is a very dangerous charge.

The problem for Mueller starts with whether or not that happened. If it did not happen, Mueller lied to the FBI to get a warrant, and that is potentially a big problem for Mueller. Keep this in mind.

If Trump did instruct Cohen to pay Daniels (and again, this is just speculation, there is no evidence for it right now), but did not put it in writing, again this makes Mueller look bad. Instead of Trump having to prove his innocence, Mueller becomes a suspect in a criminal investigation.

Never forget that Cohen and Trump have worked together for years. Is anybody stupid enough to think they did not consider that an enemy might try something like this raid to go after Trump? Well, apparently Bob Mueller is that stupid.

Don’t be surprised if today’s stunt results in someone resigning in disgrace. But if that happens, it’s going to be Bob Mueller that ends up shamed and jobless.

Bearding the Crystal Dragon – Thoughts on the ‘Deep State’ and Modern Conspiracies
Weekend Caption Contest™ Winners Week of April 6, 2018

https://trumpsminutemen.org/